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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Oct 7, 2011 7:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

There is an interesting divide between folks who went to more than one or two shows, traveled wherever and went through that unique coming of age process and those who didn't. I don't get how you can just take the music and, eh with everything else. I wouldn't necessarily buy the cookbook, but after eating lentil dahl & rice for days, maybe a idea from the cookbook is a good thing. Of course, borrowed from my neighbor two cars down. I've noticed other things too, but I'll think I'll save it for a thread.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Oct 7, 2011 9:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

"I don't get how you can just take the music and, eh with everything else."
Seems easy enough to me. Like, I love the Beatles but I'm not so keen on all the manifestations of Beatlemania - the love-stricken girls who ran shrieking after them, the cartoons, the kids' products & memorabilia - except in terms of social history. While massively important in the story of the group and the '60s, it's not as important to me as their music... I would not run out to buy a book of illustrated "Love Letters To Ringo"!

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2011-10-08 04:56:03

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Oct 7, 2011 9:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

Apples and oranges LiA. The Beatles were a pop band whose fan base never had the time to form their own culture.

Ringo's love letters. Really? Ringo got love letters?

GD folk art directly comes from the music, but also from the longevity which allowed us dheads to form relationships w/ each other and interpret the music through our own or collective vision. BB King may have more shows played, but his cultural footprint is very light. Not like GD's . The Beatles may have the fan fare, but they are fading into history while GD newbie's still are made and what a trip of music, commentary, books, and folk art they can interact with and be part of.

I am shocked that you never saw a show.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Oct 7, 2011 9:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

Ringo probably got thousands of love letters!

Yeah, there are huge & obvious differences between the Dead & Beatles - particularly in the way their respective fans shaped shows & "show culture" - I just wanted to make the point that you don't have to be a part of (or enjoy) a band's "fan culture" to appreciate the music. I could equally mention, oh, the Sex Pistols or something like that...
Can't agree with you about how the Beatles are "fading into history" - culturally speaking, the Dead are like a candle next to the Beatles' sun - but time will tell!

Anyway, band comparisons aside, you shouldn't be shocked that I never saw the Dead! That in itself should explain why "fan art" doesn't evoke much for me...
I'm obviously coming from a different perspective than most of you folks - granted, a limited one next to people with memories of what shows were like. (And heck, most of you just saw the LAME shows!...) I often feel like a lonely visitor from the future, since I came to the band just like most people in the decades to come will - without being connected to or really caring about the old "deadhead scene" - yet most people on Dead forums are still show-attendees deeply fond of that scene & the rituals of yore.


P.S. Might I mention that nobody has ever mentioned deadhead "folk art" on this forum, until this thread?

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 8, 2011 2:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

I wouldn't say it's a nostalgia trip any more than, say, all those memoirs by soldiers after the Civil War were a nostalgia trip. They were in part, of course, by those who participated. But it's also about attempting to convey a sense of felt, lived experience of a time -- and actually, the CW example isn't a great one, cuz lived experience and the flavor of a time can't be conveyed fully through text.

Visual artifacts (art, folk art, clothing, any material culture) are keys to a mindset. If someone studies Oscar Wilde, presumably they're interested mainly in his writing ... but a sense of the fashions favored by Wilde, though it wouldn't be The Most Important and Most Discussed Thing of Wilde-headedness, would be part of the picture. It does matter that he was into the Aesthetic Movement, which was an 1880s Bohemian counter-culture where women favored loose dresses and no corsets, non-chemical dyes, oriental exotica, and a generally pre-Raphaelite look. They were often artists and vegetarians. So a book on the material culture of people who would have partied with Oscar Wilde WOULD matter, historically speaking, and not just as nostalgia.

Ditto anything musical. Who DID listen to Chopin? Was it everyone, or a bit of a subgroup? Did they have some kind of shared culture that, whether related to Chopin or not, set their values apart a bit from the "mainstream"? How did they represent their ideals and esthetics in visual and material form? Etc etc ...

So if someone is into the Dead (or the Civil War or Oscar Wilde or Chopin or whatever), then an appreciation or curiosity about aspects of the surrounding culture is a pretty reasonable offshoot to that, whether you were "there" or not. (And I gather from other posts you were there time-wise ... you're not CC's or Wisconsin's age ... but weren't into the music at the time.) I expect you don't actually disagree. Just wanted to point out that just because Dead folk art isn't likely to be anyone's Main Thing here, there are reasons beyond simple personal nostalgia or experience to appreciate a book on it. Btw I never decorated an envelope :-)

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Oct 8, 2011 7:40am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

Oh, I'm sure there are many reasons people can appreciate a book on deadhead art, even as a window into one social scene. It's just not one of my interests - I'm pretty narrowly focused! I think it's more a matter of taste than significance.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Oct 7, 2011 10:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

But BB gave Hugh Romney his name .... WAVY GRAVY! Tis a fact!

Just got back from Shakedown Street at Monterey Fairgrounds with my daughter. She turned 10 a few months back and has been to see many shows - Nevilles, WIlco, Dylan, etc so she's not totally naive but she was a bit freaked by the scene (meager and diluted as it was) . Anyway, we met a guy in his mid-50s who shared his bottle of Sailor Jerry with me (http://sailorjerry.com/age-verification/?title=Sailor+Jerry&;redirect=%2f ) and gave my daughter a really nice beaded necklace. He asked her to look him in the eyes because he had something important to tell her. She did and he said: "Don't listen to what anyone else says, it's not about the drugs - - it's about the smiles." He smiled, she smiled, I smiled. It wasn't the same but it was what it was and it sure as hell wasn't about the music. (although that brought us together)

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Oct 8, 2011 12:51am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

Well, I guess I pre-dated the Great Culinary Explosion. I was thinking, "that's too funny. How do you write a recipe for PBJ?"

So I looked at the book. The french fry recipe: "Five potatoes. Soybean oil." All RIGHT! The kabob basically is stick stuff on skewers, pour on teriyaki sauce, grill. Then there's one on stuff to do with ramen noodles besides use the flavor packet.

Someone is quoted as saying, "I think it's more because of the people than the music that makes shows great." It seems to have been collected in summer of '94, so, well, perhaps the theme song of that tour could have been: "I don't know, maybe it was the french fries ... "

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Oct 8, 2011 6:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

Can I find that publisher? I have some random thoughts I would like published. And a large advance. Well, not really an advance, more like a non-refundable payment to me.

How do you make a PBJ? Butter and something... :-)

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Oct 8, 2011 6:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: New Fan Art Book from the official archive

More like, "Shake it, Sugareeeee"